Tag Archives: kim moore

Poetry Workshop, Barrow-in-Furness

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I will be running an all day poetry workshop on the 14th November at Hawcoat Park Community Centre, Skelwith Drive, Barrow in Furness from 10am-4pm.  The workshop costs £15 and beginners and experienced poets are welcome.

The day will consist of writing exercises to inspire participants to write their own poetry, and there will also be time to share a poem that you’ve previously written and receive feedback from the group.

If you would like to book a place on the workshop, please email me at kimmoore30@hotmail.com with ‘Poetry Workshop’ in the subject line.  There are about four places left at the moment.  I hope to see some of you there!

Poetry Carousel 11th-13th December 2015 – Workshop Blurbs

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There are a handful of places left on the Poetry Carousel – a residential poetry course with a difference that is running at Abbot Hall Hotel, Kents Bank, Grange Over Sands from December 11th-13th, 2015.  Tutors are myself, Amanda Dalton, Ian Duhig and Andrew Forster. All participants on the course will take part in a 2 hour workshop with each tutor over the weekend and there will be readings in the evenings from the tutors and guest poets.  Workshop groups will be limited to 8 people per workshop! For those of you who have been tempted to come, but haven’t quite made your mind up yet, have a read through of the workshops that each tutor will be running throughout the weekend.

If you would like to book, please contact the hotel directly on 015395 32896

BETWEEN WORLDS with Ian Duhig

Wallace Stevens wrote to the effect that we don’t live in places, we live in descriptions of places. On courses like these we find ourselves investigating new territory unusually subject to such words, from directions to introductions, conjuring up who we are and where we are, where we’re from and where we’re going. This workshop will look at these almost-magical processes with reference to contemporary poetry you may be unfamiliar with, due to its newness or strangeness, so that it may act as a catalyst in the alchemy of creating your own new work and new directions in your work.

OUT OF THE MARVELLOUS:ENCOUNTERS WITH THE EVERYDAY with Andrew Forster

Heaney’s phrase celebrates the wonders encountered in daily existence. Our lives are made up of tiny encounters , with animals, people, places, objects, ghosts even, that leave us changed in large or subtle ways. In this workshop we’ll look at the way poets have handled some of these meetings, and try some strategies to get started on encounter poems of our own.

VOICE, STORY, CHARACTER, ACTION – with Amanda Dalton

In this playful, practical workshop we’ll utilise some of the contents of the theatremaker’s toolbox to explore what happens when we apply them to making poems. Working with everyday objects, scraps of found text, and fine art prints, we’ll make a start on creating some of our own story-poems, finding new voices along the way.

WHAT WORK IS – with Kim Moore

Effort, toil, task, job, labour, slog, chore, drudgery, exertion. In an article published by Jeremy Seabrook in The Guardian in 2013 he argues that “Words indicating labour in most European languages originate in an imagery of compulsion, torment, affliction and persecution”.  How has our concept of work changed and have contemporary poets tackled this subject? During this workshop, we will set off writing our own poems about work in all its different guises.

Poetry Workshop Carousel – New Residential Poetry Course, 11th-13th December

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 Society of Authors Awards June 2011Kim Moore  Eric Gregory AwardsandrewforsterIan Duhig (6)Question_mark_(black_on_white)

Due to an early mix-up with dates between the hotel and myself, Rebecca Goss is no longer able to tutor on the 2015 Poetry Workshop Carousel, which I’m really sad about.  She will hopefully be coming back to tutor on the 2016 course, so please watch this space!

The new dates for the Poetry Workshop Carousel are the 11th-13th December 2015.  Tutors confirmed so far are myself, Andrew Forster and Ian Duhig.  I will hopefully be able to confirm the fourth tutor in the next couple of days or so, and it will be someone as equally fabulous as Rebecca, but fabulous in a different way.

In case you missed my earlier post about this, the Poetry Workshop Carousel will be taking place at Abbot Hall Hotel, Kents Bank, Grange Over Sands.  The course will be made up of a carousel of four workshops with four different tutors.  Each participant will attend a 2 hour workshop with each tutor as part of a small, intimate workshop group.  In the evening, the groups will come together for poetry readings from the tutors and invited guest readers.  I estimate the workshop groups will be between six and eight people.

The cost of the course will be £230.  This includes four workshops, two readings on the Friday and Saturday night, accommodation and all food for the weekend – a three-course meal on Friday night, breakfast, lunch and three course evening meal on Saturday and breakfast and lunch on the Sunday.  The course begins at 4pm on Friday and finishes at 12 on Sunday.

If you haven’t been to Kents Bank or Grange Over Sands before, it is a beautiful place.  The hotel is set in wonderful grounds, right on the edge of Morecombe Bay and a two minute walk from Kents Bank train station.  There is a lovely swimming pool in the hotel and the intention for the weekend is to take over the hotel with poets!  If you have any questions at all about the course structure or content, please get in touch with me via the Contact page.  Places are limited and I’m expecting them to go quickly, so if you would like to book, please phone Abbot Hall directly on  015395 32896.

Over the weekend, I’m planning to put up a draft programme for the weekend, but the start time for the first workshop will be 4pm on Friday 4th December and the finish time will be Sunday lunchtime at 12pm, if you are thinking about booking trains.

Here is a little bit more information about the fantastic tutors who I’ve chosen not just because of their reputation as poets, but also because of their reputation for running fantastic workshops.

Ian Duhig

A former homelessness worker, Ian Duhig has written six books of poetry, three of which were shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot Prize as well as the Whitbread and Costa Poetry Awards. He has won the Forward Best Poem Prize, the National Poetry Competition and was a joint winner of a Shirley Jackson Award for one of his short stories. A Cholmondeley Award recipient and Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, he has taught at all levels from beginner to post-graduate and his university posts include being the International Writer Fellow at Trinity College Dublin.  If you would like to order any of Ian’s books, you can buy them direct from Picador here

Andrew Forster

Andrew Forster is originally from South Yorkshire but he lived in Scotland for twenty years before moving to Cumbria in 2008. He has published three full-length collections of poetry, two with Flambard Press, ‘Fear of Thunder’ (2007) and ‘Territory’ (2010), and ‘Homecoming’ with Smith Doorstop (2015). ‘Fear of Thunder’ was shortlisted for the 2008 Forward Prize for Best First Collection and ‘Homecoming’ is shortlisted for the Lakeland Book of the Year Award . Two poems, ‘Horse Whisperer’and ‘Brothers’, appear in the AQA GCSE syllabus.  He has worked in Literature Development for 17 years and until recently was Literature Officer at the Wordsworth Trust in Grasmere.

Kim Moore

Kim Moore’s first full length collectionThe Art of Falling’ was published by Seren in 2015.  Her first pamphlet ‘If We Could Speak Like Wolves’ was a winner in the Poetry Business Pamphlet Competition in 2012.  It was named in the Independent as a Book of the Year, shortlisted for the Michael Marks Award and was the runner up in the Lakeland Book of the Year Award.  She was awarded the Geoffrey Dearmer prize by Poetry Review in 2010, an Eric Gregory Award in 2012 and a Northern Writers Award in 2014 and is one of five UK poets selected to take part in Versopolis, a European project aimed at bringing the work of young UK poets to a wider European audience.  Her poem ‘In That Year’ is on the shortlist for the 2015 Forward Prize for Best Published Poem.

*FOURTH TUTOR TO BE ANNOUNCED SHORTLY*

WATCH THIS SPACE!

2015 Residential Poetry Courses

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It is quarter past midnight and once I’ve finished writing this, I’ll wake up and it will be the morning of New Year’s Eve. Tomorrow I’ve somehow managed to make my day quite busy but filled with nice stuff.  I’ll be going on my last run of 2014 at 10am in the morning (I really should get to bed).  Then I’m meeting lovely poet Jennifer Copley for lunch.  More about Jenny in a minute.  Then I’m going to meet the other 8 members of Soul Survivors to have our photo taken for the local paper to promote our first big gig on January 30th.  That’s at 3pm.  Then I’m going round to my friend’s house who is pregnant and due any day now.  I’m having a quiet New Year’s Eve this year apart from all that, probably just staying in with the husband, who is currently ill and has spent the last couple of days languishing on the sofa with post viral fatigue syndrome.

On Sunday night, after posting my last blog post, I realised I’d forgotten to tell my lovely poetry news in all the excitement.  Poetry Review arrived and it has two of my poems in – one poem ‘The World’s Smallest Man’ which my lovely friend John Foggin helped me with when I sent an early draft to him, and ‘How the Stones Fell’ which is a rewrite of Ovid’s Creation Myth, again linked to John Foggin.  We both became a bit obsessed with Ovid last year.

I felt really annoyed with myself for forgetting.  I originally started this blog to document what it was like to be a poet and do everything else alongside, and last weekend I forgot the important parts.  I’m not talking about being published although that is lovely, but the process of being a poet.  I’m not sure I’m explaining what I mean properly.

It has something to do with not reading enough which leads to not writing enough, to being too busy to go to my regular writing groups.  It’s something I want to (am going to) change in 2015.

Anyway, I know this is a stupid time to blog.  It’s gone midnight, most of you will be in bed I’m guessing.  And I’m doing my proper round up tomorrow where I look back through 2014.

But first I want to look ahead and draw your attention to the residential course I’m running in Grange Over Sands in 2015.  Details are below.  I’d love to see some of you there.  Half the spaces have gone already, despite me forgetting to publicise it with everything else going on.  It will be a week of nothing but poetry.  Maybe a bit of wine and good food as well actually.  But there will be time to read, write, talk, think about poetry.  It won’t break the bank.

You’ll be glad to know that myself and Jennifer Copley, although we forgot to really publicise the darn thing, have planned it meticulously.  There will be a detailed timetable going up at some point in the next two weeks with a short summary of each workshop.

I’m also going to try and get some testimonials from previous participants, just in case you needed any more convincing.

Here is the most up to date information about the course

Residential Poetry Course – ‘The Stories We Tell Ourselves’
Monday 30th March – Friday 3rd April Abbot Hall Hotel, Grange Over Sands

£370 includes accommodation, breakfast and three course evening meal and all workshops and readings

During this week we will explore how to use narrative in our poetry.  Using fairytales, myths, legends and your own family history we will start to create our own untold stories.  Suitable for all ranges of ability – come and join us for a week of workshops, discussions and readings. We will be joined by two mystery guests mid-week.

Booking is now open – please ring the hotel directly on 015395 32896.

If you have any questions about the course please get in touch via the Contact Page.

 

Sunday Poem – Kim Moore

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Evening all!  I’ve had one of those weeks that feels like you’re barely holding on to the reins of a horse that I have no idea of how to control other than to hold on for dear life.  This was my first proper week back into teaching and it was full on straight away.  Monday was the Barrow Shipyard Junior Band’s first rehearsal of this academic year as well and they turned out in force and with enthusiasm and excitement and daftness.  I love that they are so excited to see each other but I was slightly wrong footed last week – usually the first rehearsal is quiet till things get going so I was expecting an easier time of it but this week I’m ready for them – armed an arrangement of Dr Who and not afraid to use it!

After band I sped off to Dalton to the back room of a pub and did a rehearsal with Soul Survivors, the new Soul Band I’m playing with, which was really enjoyable.  It’s starting to sound really good now – although I did feel for the poor bar maid, having to listen to the same song, over and over again.

Tuesday was another full day of teaching, not finishing till 5pm with another band practice and Tuesday was officially meant to be our Exchange day.  However for various excruciating and boring reasons it didn’t happen, hasn’t happened and I think Scotland will be independent before I move out of my house and into my new one. On Tuesday night I went to Barrow Writers and took one of my running poems to get feedback on.  Just the act of reading it aloud made me realise I was being indulgent and gave me some ideas of where to cut it down a little.  On Tuesday Alison Brackenbury and David Scott were reading in Grasmere, which I was sad to miss, as I was looking forward to it, but we desperately needed a meeting for Poem and a Pint in advance of our event on Saturday and after Barrow Writers was the only time everybody could make.

Now I was remonstrated with yesterday by Martin Copley because my blog, has, apparently become too full of Running Talk which he is not a fan of at all.  So this will be a test to see if he has read up to here – if you have Martin, HELLO! And if you haven’t, well that Martin Copley has the loyalty of a fish is all I can say and I can continue to tell you about Wednesday, when I did the Ulverston 5k race and managed to complete 5k in 22 minutes and 54 seconds, thus meeting my self-imposed target of running said event in less than 23 minutes, so that was very exciting for me.

More excitingly, the husband ran it with me, and as he doesn’t run very much, I thought it would be easy to kick his butt and glory in my victory.  However I didn’t bank on his hiking/cycling stamina and realised he was right next to me at the 4th kilometre and what’s worse was even trying to beat me! How rude is that.  Here is a photo of us finishing the race – and if you have to ask whether he managed to beat me, you clearly don’t know me at all!

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On Thursday I spent the whole day doing admin things for my poetry work – sending invoices, planning the ‘Early Morning Writing Workshop’ for Ilkley Literature Festival – there is a link here if you fancy booking yourself on.  I’m really excited about the poems I’ve found for this workshop.  I also finally, and slightly late completed a short article about Sylvia Plath which I’d been asked to write by Artemis.  The rest of Thursday was spent eating, walking the dogs and going running to try and get Wednesday out of my legs which I don’t think worked well because my legs felt really heavy for the rest of the week.

On Friday I planned my Young Writers workshop in the morning and then went off to Kendal to deliver the workshop – there was a new member this week who seems very nice.  Due to cuts in funding, the Young Writers Group will only be running every other week from now on, which is sad, but at least it can keep functioning.

On Saturday my legs were too heavy and I was worried about a little twinge in my hamstring from my Wednesday exertions so I didn’t do park run, but just went for a very slow run with Chris and the dogs instead and then spent the rest of Saturday tidying my rather scruffy house up ready for the arrival of Rhian Edwards, who was the guest poet at Poem and a Pint last night.  I also edited my running poem at the last minute to read as my MC’s poem – I’m still not completely happy with it, but am glad that I gave it a first airing.

Poor Rhian had a six hour journey to get here from South Wales which involved a replacement bus service as well, but I think that even the rigours of travel were nothing compared to looking after a young baby and she assured me she’d actually had quite a nice journey!  Rhian was fabulous at Poem and a Pint – I particularly enjoyed hearing her new poems about birds and folklore and the body and transformation – something very close to my heart at the minute and I can’t wait to see them in print.

After Poem and a Pint we went for a curry and stuffed ourselves with poppadoms and then came back and gossiped till about 2 in the morning which didn’t seem excessive at the time, but when I woke up this morning, definitely did.  To make matters worse, we then continued to gossip till 9.35 when I suddenly realised what the time was and bundled Rhian into the car to get her to Ulverston for 10am so she could get her replacement bus service back to Preston and then on to South Wales.

For the rest of the day I’ve been playing at the Beech Hill Hotel Wedding Fayre with the South Lakes Brass Ensemble. It was our first experience of playing at a wedding fayre and it was fairly quiet and low-key.  I don’t know if it will lead to any bookings, but we did get some free pieces of wedding cake from the other stalls and a magician turned a piece of paper into a Ferrero Rocher (is that how you spell it?) for me so that was rather exciting.

I was also supposed to be moving on Monday but – well I won’t say that solicitors, estate agents and mortgage brokers are all incompetent, but I think somehow the ones I have found have proved themselves to be exactly that, so moving on Monday is now off, and we are waiting for them to suggest a date.  We have gone on strike and said we are not suggesting dates because it doesn’t seem to work.

And that was my week! Due to a complete lack of organisation, I haven’t got a Sunday Poem for tonight.  So I’m having to put one of my own in, which is against all the rules, as this is supposed to be about poems that I’ve read that I like, not my own poems.  However, desperate times call for desperate measures.  Things will resume normal service by next week I hope.

On Twitter this week I discovered another poet, Simon Barraclough who also plays the trumpet which excited me tremendously as I’ve not met another trumpet playing poet before.  This came about when Holly Hopkins mentioned my poem ‘The Curse of the Trumpet Teacher’ which was published in a recent issue of The Rialto.

So I thought I would post the poem up here, for anybody that is interested, with a link to The Rialto, which not only is a magazine which smells good and looks beautiful but it also has great poetry in as well and I’m sure would be very welcoming of any of you taking out a subscription to support the publication of great poetry.

The Trumpet Teacher’s Curse – Kim Moore

A curse on the children who tap the mouthpiece
with the heel of their hand to make a popping sound,
who drop the trumpet on the floor then laugh,
a darker curse on those who fall with a trumpet
in their hands and selfishly save themselves,
a curse on the boy who dropped a pencil
on the bell of his trombone to see if it did
what I said it would, a curse on the girl
who stuffed a pompom down her cornet
and then said it was her invisible friend who did it,
a curse on the class teacher who sits at the back
of the room and does her paperwork,
a curse on the teacher who says ‘I’m rubbish at music’
in a loud enough voice for the whole class to hear,
a curse on the father who coated his daughter’s trumpet valves
with Vaseline because he thought it was the thing to do,
a curse on the boy who threw up in his baritone
as if it was his own personal bucket.
Let them be plagued with the urge to practice
every day without improvement, let them play
in concerts each weekend which involve marching
and outdoors and coldness, let their family be forced
to give up their Saturdays listening to bad music
in village halls or spend their Sundays at the bandstand,
them, one dog and the drunk who slept there the night before
taking up the one and only bench, gods, let it rain.

 

Poetry in St Ives

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Evening all!  Today I suddenly remembered it is already June and I need to crack on with advertising the next Residential Poetry Course that I’m running with the wonderful Clare Shaw as co-tutor this October.  I can’t believe how quickly this has come round. Apparently about a third of the places have gone already and I am expecting the places to go quite quickly so if you are thinking of coming, get in touch with the hotel and book a place – contact details below.

 

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‘The Call of the Tide’ Residential Poetry Course,
Treloyhan Manor Hotel, St Ives, Cornwall,
27th- 30th October 2014

Course Leaders: Kim Moore and Clare Shaw
Come and join us for a week of workshops, discussions and readings.  The theme of the week will be ‘The Call of the Tide’.  In the beautiful setting of St Ives and surrounded on three sides by the sea, we will explore how encounters with the tide, the coast and the forces of nature can inspire and inform our writing.  There will be two mystery guest poets who join us mid week and time for one-to-one tutorials.

For more information or to book please go to the Treloyhan Manor Hotel website: http://www.christianguild.co.uk/treloyhan/interestbreaks.php

Alternatively you can ring the hotel directly on 01736 796240

There are limited numbers and we are expecting the course to be full, so please book your place early to avoid disappointment

Draft Timetable

Monday 27th October
2.30pm-5pm –Workshop with Clare Shaw and Kim Moore
“What the Tide Brings In” –
As we set sail on five days of creative discovery and development, we’ll meet and greet our fellows travellers in this introductory session. We’ll also start to explore the forces that flow through poetry; and to establish how we’ll discover and develop those throughout the week.  

8pm – Evening Reading in the lounge
Bring a favourite poem to share with the group, written by somebody else.

Tuesday 28th October

10am-1pm – Morning Workshop with Clare Shaw
“What the Water Gave Me”
Inspired by the ocean and what it offers, we’ll examine the principles of powerful language at work in contemporary poetry, and at how we can put them into practice in our writing.

3pm-5pm – Afternoon Workshop with Kim Moore
‘I need the sea because it teaches me’ – Pablo Neruda – Tuesday afternoon workshop with Kim
What has the sea taught us, and what is there left still to learn?  What can we learn from the people/fish/birds/animals/lighthouses/rocks/the moon/the stars/inanimate objects that make their home in or near the sea? We will attempt to answer these questions with poems, which will hopefully leave us with more questions than we started with…

8pm – Poetry Reading in the Lounge with Kim Moore and Clare Shaw
Wednesday 29th October
10am-1pm Morning Workshop with Clare Shaw and Kim Moore –
“The Edges of the Tide” –
From Arnold via Larkin to Oswald and beyond, poetry is created where ocean meets land. Following in their footsteps (weather allowing), we’ll take our inspiration from the extraordinary human and physical landscapes of the coast, and create some poetry of our own.

Free Afternoon – Tutorials available – participants to sign up at the beginning of the week

8pm – Poetry Reading in the lounge with two Mystery Guests

Thursday 30th October
10am-1pm – Morning Workshop  with Kim Moore
Stories of the Tide – Thursday morning workshop with Kim
The ocean plays a central role in the stories and myths that we tell ourselves.  The sea is a part of many idioms and phrases in language.  How can we use these myths, stories and phrases to enrich our own poetry? 

3-5pm – Afternoon Workshop  with Clare Shaw
“its always our self we find in the sea”: …. the ocean, the voyage and and lifewriting.
Ocean is one of the richest sources of metaphor. Whether literally or metaphorically, we’ll go beachcombing and find some version of ourselves to write about. 

Optional “Page to stage: performing your poetry” from 5-6pm with Clare Shaw

8pm – Poetry Reading in the lounge by Course Participants –
A chance for participants to read poems written on the course, or work they have brought along with them.

31st October

10am-1pm – Morning Workshop- with Clare Shaw/Kim Moore
A chance to bring a poem for feedback from the group and the tutors.  This can be a poem you have written on the course or one you have brought from home.